BookWyrm
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  • I am going to start work on another Terraria Escape Room, this one themed for the 10 year anniversary of the TCF.
    As I've not been here that long, I would appreciate it if anyone who wants to could help me by posting their favorite moments from the past decade of TCF, just so I have something to work with and commemorate.
    Everything helps, thanks.
    Daily Dose of Nature #10:
    Misumessus oblongus, or the American Green Crab Spider, is a species of Crab Spider native to Canada, the United States, and Mexico. The Wikipedia page sucks. (Wikipedia)
    Crab Spiders in general (Thomisidae) are a family of spiders with over 2,100 species.

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    BookWyrm
    BookWyrm
    Members of this family do not spin webs, instead they are ambush predators, waiting for something to come close before murdering it for lunch. They are called crab spiders because they look like crabs... Predictably. They are not harmful to humans. Crab spiders have evolved to look like the stuff they hunt on.
    BookWyrm
    BookWyrm
    This camouflage helps them remain undetected while they either sneak up to prey, or let prey come to them. (Wikipedia)
    BookWyrm
    BookWyrm
    Fun fact about the family Aphantochilus, which was incorporated into the Thomisidae family in the 1980s, these spiders mimic ants (very well) to creep into colonies for food. ((this page also sucks)Wikipedia)
    Daily Dose on Nature #9:
    Eastern Poison Ivy, or Toxicodendron radicans, is an allergenic flowering plant that occurs in Asia and eastern North America. It is not related to true ivies. The plant releases its essence of the underworld onto anything that touches it.

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    BookWyrm
    BookWyrm
    This essence, Urushiol, causes itchy and sometimes painful contact dermatitis. Poison Ivy is eaten by deer, and its berries are food for birds in the fall. Fun fact about Poison Ivy, it is in the same family as Mangos and Pistachios. (Wikipedia)
    Daily Dose of Nature #8:
    Virginia Creeper, or Parthenocissus quinquefolia, is a species of flowering vine in the grape family (Vitaceae). It is native to eastern and central North America, from southeastern Canada and eastern United States west to Manitoba and Utah, and south to eastern Mexico and Guatemala.

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    BookWyrm
    BookWyrm
    The name 'quinquefolia' comes from latin and means 'five leaves', referring to the five leaflets on each compound leafs of the plant. Virginia creeper is grown as an ornamental plant because of its ability to cover walls quickly and its bright red fall foliage. In the UK, this plant has been added to the invasives list, and those growing it are encouraged to take great care with the samples.
    BookWyrm
    BookWyrm
    Fun fact about Virginia Creeper, it clings to surfaces using adhesive pads, instead of penetrating roots (as do ivies (to which Virginia Creeper is not related)) this means that they can safely be planted on masonry without damage, and can cool buildings during the summer by shading the walls. (Wikipedia)
    Terror of the Peaks
    Terror of the Peaks
    We used to have Virginia Creeper in our backyard.
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    Daily Dose of nature #7:
    Eastern Redbud, or Cercis Canadensis, is a large deciduous shrub native to eastern North America. It is the state tree of Oklahoma. The buds are edible and have a sweet flavor (because nectar). The leaves are eaten by the caterpillars of some Lepidoptera.

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    zenithspeed
    zenithspeed
    wait... native to eastern north america????? i see bois like this all over our garden, and i'm in eastern europe
    eh, probably an import or a close relative
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    BookWyrm
    BookWyrm
    They're native to eastern North America, but can be found across the world.
    Native just means that's where they originate from
    zenithspeed
    zenithspeed
    yeah that's what i realized mid-writing, so i just strikethrough'd it and corrected myself with the non-strikethrough'd text
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    Daily Dose of Nature #6:
    Hawthorn (Crataegus) is a genus of several hundred species of shrubs and trees is the rose family (Rosaceae). It is native to temperate regions of the northern hemisphere in Europe, Asia, North Africa, and North America.

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    BookWyrm
    BookWyrm
    The 'berries' and leaves of many species are edible. The leaves can be used in salads, ans the berries are often used to make jam. Fun fact about Crataegus, since it is in the rose family, it is also related to apples, and some species have very similar tastes. (Wikipedia)
    7/20/24:Terradle in 3
    7/19/24: Terradle in 12
    7/18/24: Terradle in 4
    7/17/24: Terradle in 5
    7/16/24: Terradle in 5
    7/15/24: Terradle in 3
    Daily Dose of Nature #5:
    Smilax is a genus of about 300-350 species of flowering plants found in the tropics and subtropics worldwide. Common names include Greenbrier, Catbrier, Prickly-Ivy, and Smilax itself. The leaves are edible (though the older ones are quite tough), and many parts of the plant have been used in different cultures for medicinal benefits.

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    BookWyrm
    BookWyrm
    I'm not actually sure what species I've got here, and I'm not about to go down he entire list of them to figure it out (It's in eastern North America). Fun fact about Smilaxes, the root of Jamaican sarsaparilla (one of the many species) is used to make the Sarsaparilla drink and other root beers. (Wikipedia)
    Daily Dose of Nature #4:
    The Paw Paw, or Asimina Triloba, is a small deciduous tree native to the eastern United States and southern Ontario, Canada. The Pawpaw is (not including gourds) the largest fruit native to North America.

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    BookWyrm
    BookWyrm
    Pawpaw fruits are sweet with a custard-like texture, and a flavor similar to that of Banana, Mango, and Pineapple. They are commonly eaten raw, but also used to make ice cream and baked goods. The leaves, bark, and seeds, however, contain the potent neurotoxin Annonacin, which is found in in some fruits of the family Annonaceae which the Pawpaw is a part of.
    BookWyrm
    BookWyrm
    The reason Pawpaws aren't sold anywhere is because the fruits have no shelf-life and are easily bruised, this has lead to them being more valuable to those who enjoy them.
    BookWyrm
    BookWyrm
    Fun fact about the Pawpaw, it is what is called a 'fossil tree', because the species is so old. Its original seed-dispersers were the Giant Ground Sloths, who would eat the fruit. (Wikipedia)
    -Escape Room Status (7/12/24)-
    I've finished basically everything.
    I found some bugs, and smushed them.
    I've polished everything, painted what needed to be painted, grave-proofed the whole map, and I believe I'm about ready to release.​
    Daily dose of nature #3:
    Frog Friday!
    The first two are Green frogs (Lithobates clamitans (the latin word 'clamitans' literally means 'noisy')), which are a species of of frog (obviously) native to eastern North America.

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    BookWyrm
    BookWyrm
    If you can't tell by the images, the thing is about the size of a penny. It gets its common name from its chirping call, which marks the beginning of spring. Fun fact about Spring Peepers, they can survive freezing temperatures due to their ability to flood their bodies with a kind of self-made antifreeze. (Wikipedia)
    BookWyrm
    BookWyrm
    Got some more green frogs

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    The Devourer of Gods
    -Escape Room Status (7/11/24)-
    I've ditched the weekly schedule because I don't think there are enough weeks between now and when I'll actually release the thing.
    I am currently done adding things to the map. The only bits I've left to do are polishing, painting, grave-proofing, and testing.
    Daily dose of nature #2:
    Chocolate Tube slime, or Stemonitis Splendens, is a type of slime mold that grows in small clusters on decaying wood.

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    I have decided to try something new here and start giving little facts about nature every day.
    Daily Dose of Nature #1:
    The brown-belted bumblebee, or Bombus griseocollis, is a species of bumblebee native to much of the United States except for the southwest, and to the southernmost regions of Canada.

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    -Escape Room Status (7/7/24)-
    Progress is promising, I don't have too much left to do now.
    I'll be posting a teaser every week now, as there's not much left to do.
    1720371616907.png
    Wishing all of you out there a good day,
    -BookWyrm​
    -Escape Room Status (6/30/24)-
    Having taken a few months' break, I'm back and ready to build again.
    While I'm not quite close to my projected end yet, I estimate that I've only a few more months to go.
    As much of it is, as of yet, unplanned, I am still open to suggestions.
    Wishing to everyone out there a good day,
    -BookWyrm​
    7/14/24: Terradle in 6
    7/13/24: Terradle in 8
    7/12/24: Terradle in 10
    7/11/24: Terradle in 2
    7/10/24: Terradle in 8
    7/9/24: Terradle in 6
    7/8/24: Terradle in 9
    7/7/24: Terradle in 3
    7/6/24: Terradle in 4
    7/5/24: Terradle in 2
    7/4/24: Terradle in 8
    7/3/24: Terradle in 3
    7/2/24: Terradle in 9
    7/1/24: Terradle in 5
    6/30/24: Terradle in 6
    BookWyrm
    BookWyrm
    Time to start Terradle again after over a month
    5/19/24 - 6/29/24: N/A
    5/18/24: Terradle in 2
    5/17/24: Terradle in 3
    5/16/24: N/A
    5/15/24: Terradle in 6
    5/14/24: N/A
    5/13/24: N/A
    5/12/24: Terradle in 6
    5/11/24: Terradle in 11
    5/10/24: Terradle in 4
    5/9/24: N/A
    5/8/24: Terradle in 9
    5/7/24: Terradle in 3
    BookWyrm
    BookWyrm
    Having reached the character limit on the previous Terradle log, I have made a new one.
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